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OCD Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Support Group & Information

OCD Introduction How Common is OCD What Causes OCD? Symptoms of OCD
Other Features of OCD Co-existing Illnesses with OCD Treatment for OCD Getting Help for OCD
Research for OCD Medications for OCD Side effects of OCD Medications Behavior Therapy and OCD
Psycotherapy and OCD Back to Home Page

OCD Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Chat Support Group

Getting Help for OCD

If you feel you may have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) it would be in your best interest to seek a mental health professional to discuss your concerns with.  Your family doctor, a local clinic or your local health department may be able to refer you to someone that will be of help to you and deciding where to go.  Once the initial diagnosis is made, you can see a mental health specialist and decide what would be in your best interest as far as treatment and/or medication. 

You can also talk to the department of psychiatry at a major medical center or the department of psychology at a university and they may have specialists who are skilled in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and are able to provide therapy or recommend another doctor that can help you.

What the Family Can Do to Help

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) doesn't just affect the survivor of this disorder, it also affects the family members and friends because it is hard for someone that isn't experiencing the fears, obsessions and compulsions that accompany OCD to understand why they cannot stop the rituals fand other distressing behaviors. When family members show anger it can result in an increase of stress for the survivor of OCD and cause an increase of obsessive and compulsive behavior. Or, to keep the peace, they may assist in the rituals or give constant reassurance.

The most important thing a family member can do to help a person with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is to read as much literature as they can on this disorder and get educated.  Families can learn specific ways to encourage the person with OCD to adhere fully to behavior therapy and/or pharmacotherapy programs. Self-help books are often a good source of information. Family members can also seek help from a therapist trained in the field, and even gather information on the internet.  The internet is a very valuable tool, chat rooms are also good ways to gather information and to talk to other people that have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and learn from them.

Families can also join educational support groups with their loved one and learn a lot of  information and coping skills through this.

If You Have Special Needs

Individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Among organizations that offer information related to the ADA are the ADA Information Line at the U.S. Department of Justice, (202) 514-0301, and the Job Accommodation Network (JAN), part of the President's Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities in the U.S. Department of Labor. JAN is located at:

West Virginia University
809 Allen Hall
P.O. Box 6122
Morgantown, WV 26506
Telephone (800) 526-7234 (voice or TDD)
(800) 526-4698 

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